Berlin: Day Two

The second day in Berlin started with the Pergamonmuseum.  The museum gets its name because it houses the Alter of Pergamon which was discovered and later excavated by a German.  So what remains along with some reconstruction is inside a huge exhibition space.  The rest of the museum contains ancient antiquities (I’m not really a big fan of countries displaying antiquities of other countries when the acquisition of the artifacts is usually shady, at best).  With that said there was some pretty awesome, well preserved artifacts inside.

The rest of the day was quite eventful as we encountered a student protest, which we knew was going to happen, we just didn’t realized we would end up in the middle of it.  Later we ventured to the Bauhaus Archive, only to find it was closed for renovations.  A project that began in April and is to be done in July.  I don’t understand but that was disappointing.

And finally we capped off the day with a visit to the Berlin Jewish Museum.  The new building designed by Daniel Liebskind was quite the treat.  I know I usually have nothing good to say about Liebskind, but the building is fabulous.  Particularly striking was the Holocaus Tower, a concrete void with no artificial conditioning and lighting.  The only light enters for a small sliver near the roof.  It was cold, dark, and quite moving.

Ancient Greek statue at Pergamonmuseum

Ancient Greek statue at Pergamonmuseum

Students taking to the streets in Berlin

Students taking to the streets in Berlin

Sign for Bauhaus Archive, I did get myself a button to prove I was there

Sign for Bauhaus Archive, I did get myself a button to prove I was there

Exterior facade of Berlin Jewish Museum new building

Exterior facade of Berlin Jewish Museum new building

Light entering into the Holocaust Tower

Light entering into the Holocaust Tower

Play of light through the jagged window openings

Play of light through the jagged window openings

Stairwell in Jewish Museum

Stairwell in Jewish Museum

Another striking space in the Jewish Museum, Memory of Void

Another striking space in the Jewish Museum, Memory of Void

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